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This Week in Tech

Internet goes down at exam time - for the whole country!

Well, it does if you live in Ethiopia, Algeria, Iraq or Uzbekistan. We know that it is best practice to make sure IT and CAT learners don't have internet access whilst writing their prac exams. In fact, many of us even restrict their general network access to prevent messaging, e-mail and file sharing being used for cheating. After all, leaving the access provides the temptation... BUT, to disconnect a whole country from the internet for the duration of national exams in all subjects seems a little extreme. There's a bit more behind the story than paranoia and caution though - see The Guardian and Newsweek for details.

Ethiopia cut internet access for a week or two at the end of May this year. Iraq cut internet access for periods of hours (at least not days) last year, and again this year (The Verge). Algeria did it last year (Reuters). Uzbekistan did it in 2014 (Ed Tech Times). In all these countries the internet lockdown was presaged by widespread leaks of papers on social media and general cheating and corruption. This is a fascinating topic for a class discussion. Is the action justified? How important is the credibility of a national exam? Why do we have national exams? What is the impact of an internet shutdown on society? Who should be able to make this kind of decision? In all cases the government seems to have acted unilaterally, without warning and often without comment or indication of how long the shutdown would last. Is this acceptable? This whole topic is pure classroom gold!

Human error - always the biggest problem with IT

I held off from talking about the immense British Airways shutdown that stranded thousands of passengers and cancelled hundreds of flights - because of a computer problem. I was curious to see what the cause of the problem would be - early reports made no mention of hacking or malware - so that left bugs or human error as the cause. I was betting on human error, because.... well, because that's what it usually is. Turns out that the real cause is pretty much the same as in this video that Apple opened its 2017 WWD Conference with (to show the importance of apps, of course)...

Yup! Over 70 000 people missed flights because someone switched off a power supply!

Your FACE is being watched - in the most unexpected places and ways

This article caught my eye: Pizzeria billboard in Oslo analyzes people! And I got curious. And did some searching and reading. Turns out there's a lot of hidden commercial face-recognition and customer recording going on out there. In Beijing, authorities are using face recognition to limit toilet paper theft in a public park! Last year Russia saw the release of the FindFace Android app that can track down and identify people from a photo (using the Russian social network Vkontakte). Facebook uses similarly powerful technology not only to tag your photos but to learn and improve its accuracy when you tag a photo. Luckily it has not made it possible for users to use this technology to search for and identify people. This didn't stop the FaceZam app hoax panicking people in March this year. Google has also had its share of the facial recognition creepiness - does anyone remember the thankfully short-lived NameTag app for Google Glass way back in 2014? Wearers of the AR glasses didn't even have to obviously take a photo using their phone to be able to scan your face and identify you!

The article that best summarises what's going on and why is at Readwrite.com and is a good value, in depth read.

Attention is the new currency” is the headline here. Your attention (and the meta-data associated with it) is being relayed to advertisers without your permission or awareness, and there is no way to opt–out.

From an article in Medium.com by Youssef Sarhan.

Moore's Law still survives

It is slowing down, but despite predictions of its death throughout my tech and teaching caree, Moore's Law is still hanging in there. The latest Intel technology (Kaby Lake) sees transistors shrink down to as small as 14 nanometers. IBM has developed new technology which use 'silicon nanosheets' to shrink chip technology down to an incredible 5 nanometers! That means the same chip area can hold double the amount of transistors. Wired has the details.

Extreme overclocking.

Did you know there is an Overclocking World Cup? This event has been held at Computex for the last four years and involves the arcane arts at getting a standard CPU to run at ungodly speeds (e.g. 7.5 Gigahertz) long enough to be deemed stable and successful. It typically involves the use of extreme cooling using liquid nitrogen. Engadget writer Richard Lai walks you through the process of learning this extreme (and pointless beyond demonstrating that it 'can be done') art.

SA Internet - where we're at and where we're going.

Short and sweet: ADSL and fixed lines are out, Fibre and Mobile are in. For information, Telkom recently announced two interesting pieces of information:

That's it for this week - never fear, the holidays are near!...

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