Providing quality teaching resources for the 'computer subjects' (CAT and IT) since 1995.
We believe that all learners should be comfortable with computers as part of their lives.
Content is presented through real-life examples and scenarios, so that learners may identify with the material more easily and make it relevant to their lives / experiences.
We provide videos, PowerPoint presentations, solutions to exercises and data files for exercises - all to make life easier for teachers and learners.
Stacks Image 58588

This Week in Tech

18 cores, a surf-able drone and jaywalking

Exams are upon you, so you don't have too much time to deal with in-depth news and articles right now. So this week I'll keep it short and sweet.

18 Cores

That's right: Intel just just announced a new i9 series of core processors that maxes out at 18 cores (36 threads) on a single CPU - trumping AMD's earlier announcement of a Ryzen processor with 16 cores. That's if you are willing to pay $1 999 (over R30 000) just for the CPU in your system! As always though, this development is an indication of how CPUs are developing and where they are going. That, and the fact that everybody (including Apple) seems to be trying to catch up with Google and their Tensor chip by creating silicon designed specifically for AI and machine learning.

Surf-able Drone

This is not something that is on the market, more a proof of concept used in a cool way. Digital Trends has an article on a guy delivering the match ball to a soccer cup final in Portugal.


Don't Jaywalk!!

What's jaywalking? Crossing the street anywhere that is not an official pedestrian crossing - or crossing against the light. Paris has a problem with jaywalking - statistics say that over 4000 people a year are hit by cars whilst jaywalking. So, obviously, authorities would rather people did not jaywalk and have come up with an innovative technical way to discourage people from jaywalking. Digital Trends has the details.


An AI chatbot that helps you get a job

CNN Money has and article on a startup trying to develop a chatbot that deals with recruitment and preliminary job interview questions.

VR Training midwives

Virtual reality has been 'on the cusp' of mainstream use since the early 1990's. I remember the first huge clunky VR sets and the blocky graphics that they displayed. Today's VR is much more realistic and immersive but still faces the problems of lag (even milliseconds of lag can cause headaches and sea-sickness) and expensive hardware. That said, I think VR is closer to mainstream use than ever before and is seeing some innovative use cases. An Australian University is using VR in its final exams to test how good a trainee midwife is at delivering a baby. CNet has the details.

Facial Recognition in education

A French business school will use facial recognition software to check how much attention its students are paying in class. Useful? Invasive? Creepy? You decide. read the article at The Verge. This author strongly agrees with the sentiments expressed in the second last paragraph.

I promised this week would be short and sweet - so that's where we stop! Good luck with exams, invigilation and marking!

Comments

Show more posts

Contact Information

E-mail:

Fax:

Tel:

Postal Address:

soemail

012 546 5313 or 086 293 2702

012 565 6469 or 087 230 8479 

PO Box 52654, Dorandia, 0188

Copyright Study Opportunities 2016. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy | Terms of use