Providing quality teaching resources for the 'computer subjects' (CAT and IT) since 1995.
We believe that all learners should be comfortable with computers as part of their lives.
Content is presented through real-life examples and scenarios, so that learners may identify with the material more easily and make it relevant to their lives / experiences.
We provide videos, PowerPoint presentations, solutions to exercises and data files for exercises - all to make life easier for teachers and learners.
Stacks Image 58588

This Week in Tech

Unintended Consequences

Tech is always pushing the boundaries. A continual fountain of new ideas, new gadgets and new ways of doing business bubbles up, with entrepreneurs and investors (and consumers) eagerly jumping aboard the latest bandwagon. The 'next big thing' arrives and is proclaimed by its inventors / creators / designers; we all reach, starry eyed and full of hope, for the magic that will miraculously improve our lives and ease our blighted souls.

The problem is: new tech is untried, untested and - even it performs flawlessly and does what it is meant to do in an exemplary fashion - people are wily and conniving and deceitful and will find a way to pervert the purpose of even the best technology.

This brings me to the cause of this negative and cynical rant: Poachers are trying to hack the tracking technology designed to protect and preserve their prey (Full scientific article available at Wiley Online Library). Cyber poaching. A new term to learn and loathe.


“Animal tracking can reveal animal locations (sometimes in nearly real-time), and these data
can help people locate, disturb, capture, harm, or kill tagged animals,”

Another job bites the dust

Used to be that people thought that jobs flipping burgers at fast food joints would be the last refuge for humanity whilst robots took over the world. Flappy, the burger flipping robot might hake something to say about that. Read it at Engadget and check out the video below.


Wikileaks and the CIA

The big news this week, splashed all over the news and just about every publication you care to read, is the Wikileaks publication of CIA hacking tools. The New York Times has an article detailing how to protect yourself if you are worried (summary: update, update, update!), Popular Science retcons it is all over-hyped and Digital Trends has a summary of the leak.

General news:

  • How big of a problem is spam? A single spammers list of email addresses has been found - an incredible 1.3 Billion adresses. From one spam operator. Just think how much faster and more responsive the internet would be if it were not clogged by the foul morass of spam mails.
  • It is early days yet but Google has started applying image recognition tech to videos - trying to identify objects in the video. Why it matters: You could search a video library for a specific item or scene quickly rather than suffering through endless fast forwarding. It also opens the path to all sorts of as yet unimagined analysis of video archives - as well as self-alerting surveillance systems.
  • Microsoft has announced it is creating a version of Windows Server that will run on the same type of smaller, lower powered, cheaper processors (ARM processors) that power your smartphone and tablet. Read it at Digital trends. Why it matters: This move would make servers (and data centres) cheaper and more energy efficient.
  • Android is about to overtake Windows as the most used OS globally. Why it matters: More proof that most people's first (and perhaps only) computing device will be a mobile one.
  • Prototype Red Cross Land Rover launches and lands drones from its roof - while on the go! Why it matters: Besides being sooooo cool? Improved response time and efficiency.
  • Is Facebook doing something about its Fake News problem at last? Possibly. Here's a link to a page on Facebook that allows you to declare a news item as possibly fake. Problem is, that they haven't made it generally available as yet. Why it matters: We've been talking about Fake News a lot and how it influences real life. This can help people become more aware that what they are reading is not necessarily true.
  • David Mahlobo (our very own Minister of State security) wants to monitor and restrict social media in South Africa. Why it matters: If you think that even a hint that government wants to control social media (for whatever reason) is not disturbing and dangerous then I am not sure how any amount of words can explain why this is important. Zapiro has a perfect cartoon to explain the futility of the idea and the repressive, dictatorial company that our Minister wants to join.
  • CNN announces availability of some news in 360 degree VR.
  • 3D Print has a great, but technical, article on printing baby skeletons and organs to improve neonatal care.
  • CPU Developments. AMD announces server CPU with 64 cores. Why it matters: It is always good to know the trends in CPU development (not that it is likely a consumer will have a machine with such a chip $3000 - $4000 (over R40 000 just for the CPU) . Obviously, this increases server, data centre power at the same high end price point.
Comments

Welcome to 2017

Welcome back. We hope you have had a good and welcome rest and are now gearing up to face a new year full of challenges and fulfilment.

Before we get onto other tech news, a quick reminder that we have a NEW version of the CAT Grade 10 book out - full of lots of updated, relevant information to keep your learners on track and well informed in their studies. If you haven't already done so, check out our catalogue, download our order form and get the new book - you'll be very glad you did!

Time to get skeptical

If 2016 taught us anything it is that people are terribly trusting an ill informed about the internet as a reliable source of news. The impact of fake news on the outcome of the American elections is just one example. It is our job as teachers to try to prevent out learners growing up to be gullible guppies who simply believe anything they see online and regard Facebook as their best (and only) source of news. We need to make them aware of the problem of fake news and teach them to be critical and skeptical of what they read online. Perhaps we need to get a weekly controversial news article and discuss whether it is real or fake - and how to tell the difference!

Motherboard has an article on the need to teach kids how to be skeptical of the internet.

The Joy of Tech has got a great cartoon (worth printing out and putting on your notice board) about the sad, sorry state of the internet with all its scams and abuse.

Levels of computer skills - in the first world





This chart comes from a study by the international Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development group. The OECD conducted a study of 215,942 people across 33 countries from 2011-2015. The study tested the skills of people aged 16-65 to measure their literacy in job-related tech skills. Tests ranged from simple tasks like deleting an email (considered “below level 1”), up to figuring out things like “what percentage of the emails sent by John Smith last month were about sustainability?” (considered level 3).

See the whole report here.

The work we do is important - even more so than perhaps you realise. All you need to do is look at the graph above, shudder, and know just what a difference you can (and are) making!

Computer security in 2017

What to expect? Keep it short an simple: Hacks, lots of them!

Try to remember how vulnerable computers are. Robert Morris, a founding developer of computer cryptography, had this to say about computer security:

The three golden rules to ensure computer security are:

do not own a computer;

do not power it on; and

do not use it.

Just a reminder of how bad things got in 2016: CSOOnline has an article detailing how Ransomware earned hackers $1 BILLION last year.

Also check out clickclickclick.click for a demonstration of how a website can monitor what you are doing on it. Turn on your sound for this!

New Hardware dept:

Two new drool worthy laptops have been announced at CES (the Consumer Electronics Show held in Las Vegas every year at this time). They are the Razer Valerie with THREE screen built into it. This one is so new that pricing, tech specs and availability is not being supplied. In the meanwhile Acer has launched a gaming laptop with a 21" curved screen, 64Gb RAM, 2TB RAID SSD AND 1 TB HDD, with TWO Nvidia GTX 1080 Graphics cards. This beast of a machine costs R 144 000 and will be available from February on (so you better start saving now).

True or False?

This article on Boing Boing about a water cooler hanging because its updating Windows could be fake news - or not. Either way its pretty funny!

That's it for this week. May your preparations for the year ahead be going well.

Cyber Crime history made

The UK started including Cyber Crime in its crime survey for the first time last year. Surveys do not include the whole population - so the statisticians who run them make projections from the data that they do receive from the survey. The Office of National Statistics (ONS) "estimated that there were 2.46 million cyber incidents and 2.11 million victims of cyber crime in the U.K. in 2015”.

Policing, especially in cyberspace, is no longer the exclusive preserve of law enforcement. The private sector, academia, and citizens themselves all need to be involved’

INTERPOL 22 January 2016

The National Crime Agency report can be found here and is very interesting reading. Particularly useful is the differentiation between Cyber dependant and Cyber Enabled crime:

  • Cyber-dependent crimes can only be committed using computers, computer networks or other forms of information communication technology (ICT). They include the creation and spread of malware for financial gain, hacking to steal sensitive personal or industry data and denial of service attacks to cause reputational damage.
  • Cyber-enabled crimes, such as fraud, the purchasing of illegal drugs and child sexual exploitation, can be conducted on or offline, but online may take place at unprecedented scale and speed.

Krebs On Security reports the article as follows: According to the NCA, cybercrime emerged as the largest proportion of total crime in the U.K., with “cyber enabled fraud” making up 36 percent of all crime reported, and “computer misuse” accounting for 17 percent. I am unable to find those figures in the document, but if correct then computer related crime adds up to 53% OF UK CRIME.

Bratwurst Bot - The Independent Robot Chef

A robot that takes orders then cooks and serves the required sausages independently recently performed flawlessly at a German Government event - delivering over 200 perfectly grilled Bratwurst! Take a look at the video of it in action over at Engadget,

New Graphics from nVidia and storage from Seagate.

nVidia's new TitanX graphics card includes 128 Gb of Ram includes 3 584 cores running at 1.5 Ghz delivering 11 teraflops of computing power. It costs $1200 (around R17 000).

Seagate has a new desktop drive with a 10 Tb capacity - that will cost you $535 (around R 7 600). For comparison the first 1Terabyte drive became available in 2007 and cost $399.

Referencing tool for Creative Commons images

We always have a problem getting our learners to reference properly. ImageCodr.org is a useful tool that will help them to generate correct references for Creative Commons images found on Flikr.

That's it for this week - happy teaching!

Show more posts

Contact Information

E-mail:

Fax:

Tel:

Postal Address:

soemail

012 546 5313 or 086 293 2702

012 565 6469 or 087 230 8479 

PO Box 52654, Dorandia, 0188

Copyright Study Opportunities 2016. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy | Terms of use